Alcohol crihhosis

Ashraf Ali, MD Author:

Alcohol crihhosis

Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis Share Alcoholic liver disease is damage to the liver and its function due to alcohol abuse. The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

The liver serves a wide variety of body functions, including detoxifying blood and producing bile that aids in digestion. A CT scan of the upper abdomen Alcohol crihhosis a fatty liver steatosis of the liver.

Note the liver enlargement and dark color compared with the spleen gray body in lower right. Causes Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the final phase of alcoholic liver disease.

Alcoholic liver disease does not occur in all heavy drinkers. The chances of getting liver disease go up the longer you have been drinking and more alcohol you consume.

You do not have to get drunk for the disease to happen. The disease is common in people between 40 and 50 years of age. Men are more likely to have this problem. However, women may develop the disease after less exposure to alcohol than men. Some people may have an inherited risk for the disease.

Long-term alcohol abuse can lead to dangerous damage called alcoholic liver disease. Alcoholic liver disease usually occurs after years of drinking too much.

Alcohol crihhosis

Alcohol may cause swelling and inflammation in your liver, or something called hepatitis. Over time, this can lead to scarring and cirrhosis of the liver, which is the final phase of alcoholic liver disease. The damage caused by cirrhosis is unfortunately irreversible. To determine if you have alcoholic liver disease your doctor will probably test your blood, take a biopsy of the liver, and do a liver function test.

You should also have other tests to rule out other diseases that could be causing your symptoms. Your symptoms may vary depending upon the severity of your disease. Usually, symptoms are worse after a recent period of heavy drinking. In fact, you may not even have symptoms until the disease is pretty advanced.

Generally, symptoms of alcoholic liver disease include abdominal pain and tenderness, dry mouth and increased thirst, fatigue, jaundice which is yellowing of the skinloss of appetite, and nausea. Your skin may look abnormally dark or light.

Your feet or hands may look red. You may notice small, red, spider-like blood vessels on your skin. You may have abnormal bleeding. Your stools might be dark, bloody, black, or tarry. You may have frequent nosebleeds or bleeding gums. You may vomit blood or material that looks like coffee grounds.

Alcoholic liver disease also can affect your brain and nervous system. Symptoms include agitation, changing mood, confusion, and pain, numbness, or a tingling sensation in your arms or legs. The most important part of treatment is to stop drinking alcohol completely.

You may need an alcohol rehabilitation program or counseling to break free from alcohol.

Alcoholic cirrhosis is the final stage of liver disease due to alcohol abuse. It is irreversible. Cirrhosis is the result of damage to the liver cells from toxins, metabolic problems or . Alcohol and the Liver. Cirrhosis is severe scarring of the liver and is the end result of damage to liver cells. Cirrhosis can be caused by . The prevalence of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is difficult to define because it is influenced by many factors including genetic (eg, predilection to alcohol abuse, gender) and environmental (eg, availability of alcohol, social acceptability of alcohol use, concomitant hepatotoxic insults) factors.

Vitamins, especially B-complex vitamins and folic acid, can help reverse malnutrition. If cirrhosis develops, you will need to manage the problems it can cause. It may even lead to needing a liver transplant. Symptoms There may be no symptoms, or symptoms may come on slowly.

Symptoms tend to be worse after a period of heavy drinking. Poor appetite and weight loss Nausea Small, red spider-like blood vessels on the skin As liver function worsens, symptoms may include: Fluid buildup of the legs edema and in the abdomen ascites Yellow color in the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes jaundice Redness on the palms of the hands In men, impotence, shrinking of the testicles, and breast swelling Easy bruising and abnormal bleeding Confusion or problems thinking.Drinking too much alcohol for years on end raises your risk of cirrhosis.

It causes fat and inflammation in the liver. The amount of alcohol it takes to hurt the liver is different for everyone. Alcohol-related cirrhosis: This is the most serious type of alcohol-related liver disease. Cirrhosis refers to the replacement of normal liver tissue with nonliving scar tissue.

Between 10 and 20 percent of heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis, usually after 10 or more years of drinking. Cirrhosis has many signs and symptoms, such as fatigue and severe itchy skin. They may not appear until the liver is badly damaged.

Causes include alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic hepatitis C, and chronic hepatitis B. Alcoholic liver disease is damage to the liver and its function due to alcohol abuse.

The esophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, aided by the liver, gallbladder and pancreas convert the nutritive components of food into energy and break down the non-nutritive components into waste to be excreted.

Alcohol and the Liver. Cirrhosis is severe scarring of the liver and is the end result of damage to liver cells. Cirrhosis can be caused by . Alcohol and the Liver. Cirrhosis is severe scarring of the liver and is the end result of damage to liver cells.

Cirrhosis can be caused by many things, including viral hepatitis or alcohol, or both.

Alcohol crihhosis
Help links - Rethinking Drinking - NIAAA